• November Bond 2022 Q&A

    Who developed the bond proposal?

    Greenville Middle School and L.P. Waters have been identified as the top needs in GISD. Over the course of several months, a Citizens’ Advisory Committee studied enrollment growth trends, campus capacity, district financial analysis, various project options and cost analysis, along with a public community survey. They delivered a recommendation to the Board of Trustees for a May bond. The committee was made of 47 members, including parents, district staff, business owners, and other Greenville community members identified the district’s top facilities needs.

    When voters rejected the bond, GISD leaders and community members gathered feedback. They concluded it would be wise to drop all projects except Greenville Middle School and L.P. Waters Early Childhood Education Center as the top two projects from the five projects on the original bond.

    The public was invited to a series of visioning meetings to discuss design ideas for a GMS and L.P. Waters. Attendees shared their input on topics such as building floor plans, exterior design and the best ways to honor the legacy of Carver High School. 

    These designs are a result of the feedback gathered from the community.


    Greenville Middle School – location, capacity and infrastructure

    Where would the new campus be located?

    It would be located on a 25.13-acre site that is already owned by the district. It would replace the current facility, which is 72 years old and is over capacity.

    How much land is required for a middle school, and how much would it cost to purchase land in a different location?

    A minimum of 25 acres is recommended for a middle school site. Purchasing a 25-acre site within the district would cost approximately $1 million, depending on location. Rather than purchase land, the Citizens Advisory Committee and GISD Board of Trustees opted to use land already owned by the district in the spirit of good fiscal stewardship. 

    What is the capacity of the proposed new middle school, compared with the current middle school?

    The new middle school would be able to serve 1,400 students in grades 6-8. It would be approximately 240,000 square feet. The current middle school serves approximately 800 students and is over its functional capacity. It is 142,000 square feet.

    How would drivers access the campus?

    Infrastructure and road development are part of the bond budget for the middle school. There would be two major points of access to the site:

    1.     From Wellington: Developers of the subdivision that is planned to the west of the site are planning to provide an access road through the subdivision that leads directly from Wellington to the campus.
    2.     Connecting Nevada: An addition to Nevada would allow it to run through the site, giving it clear access from Ridgecrest to Shelby. This would avoid requiring drivers to wind through the residential area. 

    Note: Initial plans called for access from Ridgecrest through property owned by Hunt Regional Medical Center, but hospital officials have reconsidered, and access through the property will no longer be possible. 

    How would drainage work at the proposed middle school site?

    The proposed middle school property collects all of its drainage, along with 30 acres draining onto it and drains northerly between Lot 6 and Lot 7 of Southern Acres. These two homes are 5110 Canton and 3605 Canton. Additionally, another detention basin collects water and drains separately to this same location. This channel feeds two 36-inch pipes under Canton Avenue and ultimately drains north of Joe Ramsey into Long Branch Creek.

    The preliminary calculations show that 2.5 acre-feet of storage are needed to hold the differential between the pre-development drainage runoff and the post-development drainage runoff. Although plans have not been developed enough yet for detailed study reports, two detention basins are currently proposed with storage volumes over 3-acre feet.

    It is a city requirement to provide detention to ensure that the post-developed runoff is equal to our less than the pre-developed runoff. A building permit will not be granted before this is proven. Additionally, it has been the school’s request to go above this requirement to ensure the post-developed runoff is less than the pre-developed runoff. Careful attention will be provided to the homes downstream of the development. The development will ensure that no adverse impacts are seen downstream of this site in drainage.


    L.P. Waters - location, capacity and infrastructure

    L.P. Waters proposed construction

    Where would the new campus be located?

    It would be located on the 10.5-acre current site that is already owned by the district. It would be relocated toward the back of the property, allowing for safer parking and drop off. It would replace the current facility, which is 72 years old and has structural issues that will need to be addressed in the near future.

    L.P. Waters infrastructure photo
    The support system for the foundation at L.P. Waters is deteriorating, according to inspection and analysis by structural engineers.

    What is the capacity of the proposed replacement campus for L.P. Waters, compared with the current school?

    The new L.P. Waters would have the capacity to serve 500 students, ages 3 and 4. Currently, L.P. Waters serves approximately 400 students.

    What are the costs of portable classrooms? 

    Portable classrooms cost ~$100,000 per unit, not including power or running water. They are not considered a good long-term solution for campuses.

    Portables


    How do facilities impact teaching and learning?

    According to an article published by the Texas Association of School Boards, "The idea that school building conditions can affect student achievement isn’t new. A 2007 study, The Relationship Between School Building Conditions and Student Achievement at the Middle School Level in the Commonwealth of Virginia, is one of many that has found that student achievement is connected to a building’s condition. Students perform better in newer or recently renovated buildings than they do in older buildings."

     

    Some key factors include:

    • Flexible learning spaces and furniture
    • Incorporation of technology
    • Acoustics and noise
    • Air quality
    • Lighting
    • Temperature control
    • Classroom size and space

    Click  HERE to read the article.

    How are cost estimates calculated?

    Building a Total Project Estimate

    Each project is calculated separately based on the following:

    • Anticipated construction cost
    • Escalation (inflation)
    • Soft costs
    • Furniture fixtures equipment
    • Technology
    • Contingency
    • Infrastructure and roadwork

    In addition, new TEA standards significantly affect the cost of new construction.

    For the citizens advisory committee and bond planning efforts, we used the following for basis of program and building size:

    L.P. Waters

    • Maximum number of students: 450
    • Maximum number of students per classroom: 22
    • TEA space standards establish the minimum size requirements for the classrooms, library and cafeteria. All of these requirements call for larger spaces than those at the existing L.P. Waters.

    GMS

    • Maximum number of students: 1,400 serving grades 6-8
    • Maximum number of students per classroom: 25
    • TEA space standards establish the minimum size requirements for the classooms, science labs, library and cafeteria. Again, all of which are larger than the existing MS. 

    How was the price for Greenville Middle School calculated?

    The new campus would serve 1,400 students and would be approximately 240,000 square feet. Significant infrastructure is required. The proposed location is on a greenfield site that GISD currently owns. New utilities, storm water detention, roads, football field, track, six tennis courts would be built to comply with current life safety building code and Texas Education Agency education space requirements. Those requirements have increased significantly since the original campus was built 72 years ago. 

    What's the difference between the May 2022 bond proposal and the November 2022 bond proposal?

    The November bond is a pared-down version of the previous bond issue from May. The smaller bond significantly reduces the tax impact and the number of projects. Here is a side-by-side comparison:

    November2022Bond-Issue Comparison Graphic

    How is the District able to issue a $136.5 million bond for only 3 cents?

    Two reasons:

    1) the tax base has increased from the time of planning for the first election and the second election, and therefore GISD does not need to project as many pennies.

    2) a portion of the first $100+ million would not require a tax rate increase, just a continuation of the existing tax rate, and therefore the math for school bond models is not linear or proportionate.

    The District has managed the debt service (I&S) tax rate in a manner that has allowed for early prepayment of existing bonds and declining payments. For example, the District’s scheduled principal and interest is declining next year from $6.5 million to $3.9 million. By managing the debt service tax rate in this manner, it only takes a 3-cent increase to issue $136.5 million of new bonds. Some have described this as the taxpayers getting about 20 cents' worth of school improvements for only a 3-cent increase.

    What is the tax impact for non-homestead property, such as rental property?

    Because rental and other non-homestead properties do not qualify for the $40,000 homestead exemption, the tax impact for non-homestead property would be $40,000 greater per year. 

    What is contingency?

    Contingency is budget set aside to cover unexpected costs that often occur. The industry standard is 2-3%.


    Taxes and Financial Information

    What is the district's 10-year tax rate history?

    2012-13 to 2022-23 Tax Rate History

    Would the tax rate for homeowners 65 and older and individuals with disabilities be affected?

    Homeowners 65 years and older and individuals with disabilities will see no increase in their property tax rate now or in the future if they have filed for their senior citizen homestead exemption or their disabled person exemption. The only exception would be if significant improvements are made to the property.

    Where are the extra funds from increases in home values and the number of homes used?

    ​On the M&O side, the extra funds from increased home values go to the State (i.e. when the District gets more local revenues, the State reduces the State Aid that they pay the District).  On the I&S side, the extra funds from increased home values serve to reduce the I&S tax rate that is necessary to pay for a certain size bond or serve to accelerate the principal payoff time period for that bond. The increased number of homes would provide more State and Local Revenues because of the presumed increase in student enrollment with the increase in new homes.

    If growth is occurring, can tax revenue from an increased tax base raise the funds to pay for this?​

    This is a good hypothetical question. In projecting tax impact, we took the conservative approach of basing projections on current numbers, rather than factoring in future growth that has not yet occurred and is not guaranteed to occur. But certainly, adding new taxpayers will alleviate the tax burden for current taxpayers.

    Along those same lines of thinking, if the new growth occurs, the need to have space to educate additional students will be necessary. Greenville Middle School is currently over capacity, and the two buildings on the bond proposal are 72 years old.

    Once the bond is paid back, will the extra property tax I’m paying for the bond no longer be added to my property or will this be a permanent tax addition?​

    Future growth will serve to reduce the I&S tax rate or pay the principal off early or both. Historically, the GISD school board has passed those savings along to the taxpayer. In fact, the school board just passed the lowest tax rate in 10 years.

    Do most school districts pay off previous bond issues before calling another bond?

    No. School finance and personal finance are not the same. People have one home and one mortgage. School districts have multiple buildings and therefore multiple financings for those buildings. It is very rare in Texas school finance for a school district to be able to pay off all prior financings before incurring another. The overwhelming majority of school districts in Texas have a new bond election while other bonds are outstanding, including most neighboring school districts. The average amortization of Texas school bonds for renovations/additions is 20 years and 30 years for new construction. Texas schools cannot wait 20 to 30 years to have a bond election.

    The assets purchased from the last bond still have useful life that will go well beyond the final maturity of the last bond. Likewise, the useful life of the assets to be financed with this new bond will go well beyond the final maturity of this bond.

    Do lower interest rates allow GISD to pay more toward principal?

    The lower the interest rates, the more favorable the scenario for the issuance of bonds. Lower interest rates, combined with GISD’s quality stand-alone bond ratings, allow the district to pay less toward interest and more toward principal.

    How do experts rate GISD's financial position?

    GISD has high credit ratings from nationally recognized independent credit rating agencies and clean audits from an independent auditor.

    Greenville ISD holds the following financial ratings:

    • Aa3 from Moody’s
    • A from S&P
    • A from School Financial Integrity Rating System of Texas (First)
    • AAA bond rating based on the Permanent School Fund Guarantee

    General questions about the bond

    What is a bond?

    Bonds are a debt tool issued over a period of time for the purpose of raising capital by borrowing from investors. Bonds are sold by a school district to competing lenders to pay for the costs of large capital projects such as new construction, renovations of existing structures or large equipment replacement.

    Why hold a bond election?

    Bonds are paid from ad valorem (property) taxes and, therefore, school districts are required by Texas state law to ask voters for permission to borrow money. If voters approve, the district will essentially take out a loan and pay back that loan with interest over time as designated by the agreed bond term limits (up to 40 year terms). This process is similar to taking out a home mortgage.

    If the bond proposal is approved, can the money be used for any other purpose than specified?

    The district can only use bond funds for the purposes described in the bond proposal. Should there be a cost savings from projects, the Board of Trustees must hold an open public meeting to vote upon the use of those funds beyond described in the bond proposal.

    Can bond funds be used to increase teacher salaries?

    Bond funds cannot be used for salaries or operating costs of the district such as utility bills, supplies, etc. These expenses must come from the district’s maintenance and operations budget.

    Bond funds can only be used to finance new construction and additions, renovations, land purchase, large equipment replacement, technology infrastructure, etc. Bond funds come from the district’s interest and sinking budget.

    What properties does Greenville ISD own? 

    To view a map of GISD properties and their acreages, please click here

    What were the results of the soil analysis from the survey taken at the old TxDOT site that the district owns?  

    To view the soil analysis report completed by Alpha Testing, please click here.


    Voting Information

    Who is eligible to vote in the bond election?

    Any registered voter who resides within the Greenville ISD boundaries. Not sure if you’re eligible to vote in the GISD bond election? Click here and use the log in to check: voter registration status, elections on your ballot, poll location, early voting locations, and key election dates.

    Is there a deadline to register?

    The deadline for voter registration is Tuesday, October 11, 2022. If you are not registered to vote by this deadline, then you are not eligible to vote in this election. The Texas Voter Registration Application can be found online here.


    2014 Bond and 2017 Financial Information/Audit

    Where can I find a list of projects and financial details from the 2014 bond issue?

    Below is a list of all the projects, which were all completed within the bond budget:

    Click HERE to see the Report Card to the Community, which was presented by Huckabee Architects at a public school board meeting and has been broadly shared over the last five years.

    There have been unfounded rumors of "missing money" circulating on social media for years. Where do those come from, and where can I find the facts to refute them?

    First, the background: In 2017, fiscal mismanagement was discovered regarding significant budgeting errors that resulted in a financial shortfall for GISD. Over the last five years, the district has regained its financial health, and financial auditors and other experts give GISD high ratings. All of the mismanagement dealt with the general fund, which comes from the M&O (Maintenance and Operations) part of the budget. 

    The rumors on social media claim the majority (68%) of the funds from the 2014 budget are "missing." If $57 million, which represents 68%, of $72.275 million were missing, that would leave $15.275 million left for all the projects. The math simply doesn't add up, and the proof is in the existence of the buildings and additions, namely Bowie Elementary School, the CTE wing of GHS, safety, security and technology upgrades on all campuses, and renovations on all campuses. $15.275 million would not be enough to complete Bowie Elementary alone, much less all the other projects.

    Bond funds come from the I&S (Interest & Sinking) part of the budget and are not related to the budgeting issue from the M&O side, which were discovered five years ago and have been corrected. 

    Next, the social media rumors are simply not based in fact. In 2017, a forensic auditor requested receipts for all expenditures related to the 2014 bond issue. Those records were at the offices of general contractor Barlett Cocke. The records were sent to the Attorney General's office, where an investigation found no wrongdoing on the part of GISD. 

    This is where the myth of the "missing money" comes from. The point the forensic auditor was making was that at the time he was interviewing staff, the Finance Department could not produce a paper trail for all expenditures to the level of detail he was requesting because those records were at the offices of Bartlett Cocke. There is a vast difference between “missing money” and a lack of detailed source documents.  

    What properties does Greenville ISD own? 

    To view a map of GISD properties and their acreages, please click here

    Where can I find the forensic audit?

    The forensic audit can be found as a link at the bottom of this Real Talk Column by Superintendent Sharon Boothe.

    The report card details how bond expenditures were allocated and disproves the rumors.


    How are the maximum capacity figures calculated for each campus?

    The Texas Education Agency requires all Texas public school districts to use the same formula for calculating maximum capacity. Here is the language from the Texas Administrative Code:

     (1) Minimum standards for common areas.

        (A) Library.

          (i) A school district shall consider the School Library Standards and Guidelines as adopted under TEC, §33.021, when developing, implementing, or expanding library services.

          (ii) The sum total square footage of all library-related areas shall meet the following minimum square feet (SF) requirements based on maximum instructional capacity and may be contiguous or dispersed:

            (I) for 100 students or fewer, a minimum of 1,400 SF;

            (II) for 101-500 students, 1,400 SF plus an additional 4 SF for each student in excess of 100;

            (III) for 501-2,000 students, a minimum of 3,000 SF plus an additional 3 SF for each student in excess of 500; and

            (IV) for 2,001 or more students, a minimum of 7,500 SF plus an additional 2 SF for each student in excess of 2,000.

        (B) Gymnasium. Primary gymnasiums or physical education space, if required by the school district's educational program, shall have a minimum of 3,000 SF at the elementary school level, 4,800 SF at the middle school level, and 7,500 SF at the high school level.

      (2) Minimum standards for special spaces.

        (A) Combination science classroom/laboratory.

          (i) A combination science classroom/laboratory for Kindergarten-Grade 5 must provide a minimum of 50 SF per student. The room may have an established maximum of 22 students but must not exceed 25. Within the total square footage of the room, 6 SF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop space (3 feet wide x 2 feet deep) must be provided at student laboratory benches, and an additional 3 linear feet (LF) per student of horizontal laboratory countertop support space must be provided for equipment and materials for investigations, activities, or student projects.

          (ii) A combination science classroom/laboratory for Grades 6-8 must provide a minimum of 58 SF per student. The room may have an established maximum of 24 students but must not exceed 28. Within the total square footage of the room, 6 SF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop space (3 feet wide x 2 feet deep) must be provided at student laboratory benches, and an additional 3 LF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop support space must be provided for equipment and materials for investigations, activities, or student projects.

          (iii) A combination science classroom/laboratory for Grades 9-12 must provide a minimum of 58 SF per student. The room may consider a maximum of 24 students but must not exceed 28. Within the total square footage of the room, 6 SF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop space (3 feet wide x 2 feet deep) must be provided at student laboratory benches, and an additional 3 LF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop support space must be provided for equipment and materials for investigations, activities, or student projects.

        (B) Science laboratory.

          (i) The separate science laboratory and classroom configuration is not permissible at the elementary level.

          (ii) A science laboratory for Grades 6-8 must be a minimum of 42 SF per student. The room must consider a maximum of 24 students but must not exceed 28. Within the total square footage of the room, 6 SF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop space (3 feet wide x 2 feet deep) must be provided at student laboratory benches, and an additional 3 LF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop support space must be provided for equipment and materials for investigations, activities, or student projects.

          (iii) A science laboratory for Grades 9-12 shall be a minimum of 42 SF per student. The room must consider a maximum of 24 students but must not exceed 28. Within the total square footage of the room, 6 SF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop space (3 feet wide x 2 feet deep) shall be provided at student laboratory benches, and an additional 3 LF per student of horizontal laboratory countertop support space shall be provided for equipment and materials for investigations, activities, or student projects.

        (C) Science classrooms. Science classrooms shall be provided at a ratio not to exceed 2:1 of science classrooms to science laboratories at the secondary level and must meet the requirements of subsection (h)(3) of this section. The science laboratories must be located in close proximity to the science classrooms they serve.

        (D) Fume hoods.

          (i) Each of the following shall have one built-in fume hood:

            (I) at least one middle school prep room per grade level served in the school facility;

            (II) high school level chemistry or Advanced Placement (AP) chemistry combination classroom/laboratory or laboratory; and

            (III) prep room serving chemistry, AP chemistry, or integrated physics and chemistry (IPC) combination classroom/laboratory or laboratory.

          (ii) A double-sided fume hood may be provided to satisfy chemistry or AP chemistry fume hood requirements.

      (iii) The exhaust shall be vented to the outside, above the roof and away from air vents.

        (E) Preparation/storage rooms. One preparation/storage room at a minimum 10 SF per student shall be provided adjacent to each combination science classroom/laboratory. One preparation/storage room at a minimum of 10 SF per student shall be provided per science classroom and be located adjacent to its partner science laboratory. Preparation/storage rooms may be combined, but the combination of more than one preparation/storage room shall not reduce the minimum square feet or quantity of built-in fume hoods required if they were not combined.

        (F) Chemical storage room. If hazardous or vaporous chemicals are to be used in a science laboratory or combination science classroom/laboratory, a separate chemical storage room shall be provided. The chemical storage room shall be separate from, and shall not be combined as part of, a preparation room or an equipment storage room; however, the chemical storage room may be located so that access is through a preparation room or equipment storage room. The chemical storage room shall be secure to prevent access to chemicals by students or non-authorized adults. One chemical storage room may be shared among multiple laboratories or classrooms/laboratories. Refer to National Fire Protection Association (NFPA), International Fire Code (IFC), and Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) for additional requirements.

        (G) Eye/face wash. A built-in eye/face wash that can wash both eyes simultaneously shall be provided in each room serving Grades 5-12 where hazardous chemicals or eye irritants are used by instructors and/or students. The eye/face wash shall comply with the American National Standards Institute (ANSI) Standards for Shower and Eyewash Equipment (Z358.1). The tepid water required by ANSI Z358.1 is not required to come from a heated source; however, school districts that commonly experience lengthy periods of extremely cold temperatures during the winter season shall consider a tepid water system with a heated source.

        (H) Safety shower. A built-in safety shower shall be provided in each combination classroom/laboratory, laboratory, or prep room where a built-in fume hood is required or voluntarily provided. Where a safety shower is required in both the laboratory and corresponding prep room, a safety shower may be provided in only the prep room to satisfy this requirement. The safety shower shall comply with the ANSI Standards for Shower and Eyewash Equipment (Z358.1). The tepid water required by ANSI Z358.1 is not required to come from a heated source; however, school districts that commonly experience lengthy periods of extremely cold temperatures during the winter season shall consider a tepid water system with a heated source.

        (I) Exhaust fan and ventilation system. Refer to International Mechanical Code, ANSI, OSHA, and NFPA for project requirements.

        (J) Emergency shut-off controls. If electricity, gas, and/or water are provided in student areas, emergency shut-off controls shall be provided for each in a location accessible to the instructor but not easily accessible to students. It shall not be located at any doorway leading to a corridor or hallway.

        (K) Special education. Specialized classrooms shall be a minimum of 45 SF per student.

    (h) Quantitative method of compliance for instructional facility space requirements. A school district board of trustees shall approve compliance with this method or the method of compliance described in subsection (i) of this section before the commencement of design development for a capital improvement project for an instructional facility.

      (1) To satisfy this method of compliance, the capital improvement project shall meet the minimum aggregate square footage based on the campus's flexibility level as specified in paragraph (2) of this subsection, the SF per student as specified in paragraph (3) of this subsection, and the maximum instructional capacity of the campus included in the project's educational specifications. Cafeterias, gymnasiums, and library space may not be used to satisfy this method of compliance. The minimum aggregate square footage required may be comprised of the following:

        (A) mathematics, English/language arts, and history/social studies classrooms;

        (B) combination science classrooms/laboratories;

        (C) science classrooms, if the separate science classroom and laboratory layout is used;

        (D) special education classrooms;

        (E) collaboration areas; and

        (F) elective classrooms or laboratories under the following circumstances:

          (i) if the elective program necessitates a SF per student in excess of the value specified in subsection (h)(3) of this section, a maximum of total square feet for the space shall be used that is equal to the value specified in (h)(3) of this section multiplied by the maximum number of students that shall be safely served in that classroom or laboratory at a time;

          (ii) if the elective classroom or laboratory is used between 51-100% of the school day, at a factor of 1; and

          (iii) if the elective classroom or laboratory is used between 0-50% percent of the school day, at a factor of .5.

      (2) The level of flexibility of a facility must be selected by a school district in order to calculate the minimum aggregate square footage under paragraph (3) of this subsection.

        (A) Flexibility Level 1 (L1). Single, fixed teacher presentation space; compact organization of spaces makes access to outdoor space limited and challenging; furniture is exclusively attached student desk/chair with an expectation of very infrequent rearrangement; minimal multipurpose functionality for walls with no capability of reconfiguration; teacher-centric digital instruction with partial access to mobile devices.

        (B) Flexibility Level 2 (L2). Single, fixed teacher presentation space; compact organization of spaces makes access to outdoor space limited and challenging, but outdoor spaces may be visible from classrooms; furniture includes detached student desk/chair with an expectation of very infrequent rearrangement; moderate multipurpose functionality for walls with no capability of reconfiguration; teacher-centric digital instruction with moderate access to mobile devices.

        (C) Flexibility Level 3 (L3). Multiple student/teacher presentation spaces; organization of spaces allows for proximal outdoor access that is visible from classrooms; flexible and mobile furniture that is easily rearranged; high use of multipurpose walls, including digital touchscreen and other functionalities; learner-centric digital instruction with high levels of access to a range of mobile devices.

        (D) Flexibility Level 4 (L4). Multiple student/teacher presentation spaces that are likely mobile; organization of spaces allows for direct outdoor access that is visible from classrooms; highly flexible and mobile furniture that is easily rearranged by students independently or collectively; maximized inclusion of multipurpose walls, including digital capabilities and reconfiguration; learner-centric digital instruction with high levels of access to a range of mobile devices incorporating an "anytime/anywhere" instructional philosophy.

      (3) The minimum aggregate square footage shall be determined based on the minimum square footage per student by campus type and the selected flexibility level approved under paragraph (2) of this subsection.

        (A) Elementary schools (prekindergarten-Grade 5):

          (i) L1 36 SF per pupil (pp);

          (ii) L2 36 SF pp;

          (iii) L3 42 SF pp; and

          (iv) L4 42 SF pp.

        (B) Middle schools (Grades 6-8):

          (i) L1 32 SF pp;

          (ii) L2 32 SF pp;

          (iii) L3 36 SF pp; and

          (iv) L4 36 SF pp.

        (C) High schools (Grades 9-12):

          (i) L1 32 SF pp;

          (ii) L2 32 SF pp;

          (iii) L3 36 SF pp; and

          (iv) L4 36 SF pp.

     (i) Qualitative method of compliance for instructional facility space standards. A school district board of trustees shall approve compliance with this method or the method of compliance described in subsection (h) of this section before the commencement of design development for a capital improvement project for an instructional facility. A school district may use the qualitative method of compliance for a capital improvement project only if the board of trustees has prior documented approval of one or more instructional or operational practices for the proposed project that distributes or manages student capacity in an innovative or non-traditional manner. Prior to approving the qualitative method of compliance, all instructional and operational practices applicable to the proposed project must have been documented and approved by the school district board of trustees to demonstrate compliance with the requirements in this subsection.

      (1) To satisfy this method of compliance, the project shall meet the minimum total square footage based on the campus's flexibility level as specified in subsection (h)(2) of this section, the SF per student as specified in subsection (h)(3) of this section, and the adjusted maximum instructional capacity of the campus. The minimum aggregate square footage required may be comprised of the following:

        (A) mathematics, English/language arts, and history/social studies classrooms;

        (B) combination science classrooms/laboratories;

        (C) science classrooms, if the separate science classroom and laboratory layout is used;

        (D) special education classrooms;

        (E) collaboration areas; and

        (F) elective classrooms or laboratories under the following circumstances:

          (i) if the elective program necessitates a SF per student in excess of the value specified in subsection (h)(3) of this section, a maximum of total square feet for the space shall be used that is equal to the value specified in subsection (h)(3) of this section multiplied by the maximum number of students that shall be safely served in that classroom or laboratory at a time;

          (ii) if the elective classroom or laboratory is used between 51-100% of the school day, at a factor of 1; and

          (iii) if the elective classroom or laboratory is used between 0-50% of the school day, at a factor of .5.

      (2) Gymnasiums may not be used to satisfy this method of compliance. Cafeterias and library space may be used to satisfy this method of compliance and shall be treated like an elective space under paragraph (1)(F) of this subsection.

    To read more, click HERE.